Who is Baûbo?

Our Story

We are Bethsabée Krivoshey and Cécilia Capece, two friends living and working in Paris.

Bethsabée is a writer and was a journalist for several years (Glamour, GQ, Vanity Fair), specialised in sexuality. In 2015, Bethsabée got the idea of an “after-sex and everyday” intimate balm. She had become aware that there was a need for an organic and natural care product to soothe the discomforts that can happen after sexual intercourse, a day in skinny jeans, or after swimming, cycling, periods, or during menopause...

Cécilia, MBA graduate and Director of a consulting firm at the time, loved the concept of the after-sex intimate care Balm, and proposed to start this great adventure of female, ethical and French entrepreneurship.

That’s how Baûbo was born! [Pronounce : ba-o-bo] 

Baubô's Myth

Baubô is a mythical character from Ancient Greece. Sometimes a servant, a queen or even a goddess, her story reminds us of the positive force of female sexuality, the importance of joy and the healing power of the vulva.


When Baubô meets Demeter, the goddess of Agriculture and the harvest, in Eleusis near Athens, the latter is in despair because of the disappearance of her daughter Persephone.

Welcomed in Baubô’s house, Demeter, who is depressed, refuses any food or drink, her sadness bringing about a drought in the whole country. A free, fun and wise Baubô whispers secret words to Demeter, then suddenly lifts her tunic to unveil her sex. Demeter is surprised and bursts out laughing, and then finally accepts a drink –  and through this gesture the cycle of seasons is reborn with her. Baubô, through her bawdy words (which are never revealed...) takes the goddess out of her stupor and restores the balance of the world. 

There are many representations of this myth, with Baubô depicted as a grotesque but endearing vagina-woman, with a face on her bust and the vulva as mouth. Baubô is our “sacred fool”, ancestral healer and clown.

The Eleusinian Mysteries, in Demeter’s temple, celebrated Baubô for a long time, encouraging women to live joyfully, to dance, to free themselves sexually, and to face death without fear as part of the great cycle of life.